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The goal of the English Department is to help students attain a liberal arts perspective through the comprehensive study of and exposure to language and literature, especially as a reflection of human values and cultures, a presentation of the historical development of ideas, an opportunity to respond to and appreciate multiple perspectives, and the development of communications skills.

Objectives:
  1. Students will be provided with a wide variety of literary experiences through the study of American and world literature.
  2. Students will develop an appreciation of content, purpose, and structure in literature.
  3. Students will be provided training and practice in grammar, vocabulary development, and composition skills that enable the students to communicate effectively.
  4. Students will be provided, through language and literature studies, the opportunities for inquiry, collaborative learning, and critical thinking.
  5. Students will integrate technological tools into all areas of the English learning experience.
Requirements:
Four credits in English are required at St. Joseph’s Academy:
  • One credit of Literature and Composition is required of freshmen.
  • One credit of World Literature and Composition is required of sophomores.
  • One credit of American Literature and Composition is required of juniors.
  • One credit of English courses is required of seniors. If not talking the one credit AP/ACC Senior English, one semester must be a writing-designated course and one a literature-designated course.

Courses Available for 2022-23

List of 21 items.

  • EN Literature and Composition

    Grade 9
    Year-long course, 1 credit

    In this course, framed around diverse perspectives of literature, freshmen study grammar, vocabulary, and composition skills, including an introduction to multiple essay forms and literary genres. All units of study focus on essential questions and themes that relate to all of humanity across multiple cultures.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN World Literature Analysis and Composition

    Grade 10
    Year-long course, 1 credit

    In this course, sophomores study literature using a thematic approach. Students build on previous grammar instruction by studying more complex sentence structures and punctuation, and by building strong rhetorical skills and an academic vocabulary. Students develop advanced writing skills through increased academic research, and composing in multiple modes, including but not limited to, narrative, evaluative, and argumentative pieces. Students continue honing their understanding and use of the MLA style guide.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Honors World Literature and Composition

    Grade 10
    Year-long Course, 1 credit

    In this course, sophomores study literature using a thematic approach and course essential questions. Students build on previous grammar instruction by studying more complex sentence structures and punctuation, and by building strong rhetorical skills and an academic vocabulary. Students develop their own research question about a text and use increased academic research and literary criticism to compose a research paper, using the MLA style guide. Students also compose in multiple modes of writing, including but not limited to, narrative, evaluative, and argumentative pieces. As a part of the department’s honors program, the course includes independent supplementary reading, research, and extensive writing.

    Prerequisite: B+ average in current honors course or an A in current regular course and departmental approval
  • EN American Literature and Composition

    Grade 11
    Year-long Course, 1 credit

    In this survey of American literature, juniors study literary movements, major writers, and selected works from the colonial period through the 21st century. In addition, they develop critical thinking skills as well as advanced formal and informal writing including: analysis, research-based argument, narrative, and expository. Juniors also review grammar, vocabulary, and reading and comprehension skills in preparation for the ACT.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN AP American Literature and Composition

    Grade 11
    Year-long course, 1 credit

    In this survey of American literature, juniors study literary movements, major writers, and selected works from the colonial period through the 20th century. In addition, they further analyze and write arguments while developing an understanding of the rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style. They further develop grammar and vocabulary skills and continue to work on more advanced essay skills, including analysis, evaluation, argument, and research. As a part of the department’s honors program, the course includes independent supplementary reading, research, and extensive writing.

    Prerequisite: B+ average in current honors course or an A in current regular course and departmental approval.

    Students are required to take the AP English Language and Composition exam in the spring.
  • EN Bearing Witness: Holocaust Literature of Extraordinary Lives

    Literature Course

    Grade 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    This course allows students to study extraordinary lives of the Holocaust through several different genres of literature and modes of technology including memoirs, novels, poetry, short stories, primary documents, visual testimonies, virtual reality experiences, and podcasts in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the Holocaust and its implications in the contemporary world. Students will learn of the origins of antisemitism and analyze the development of the Holocaust and its effects through the lenses of Nazis, women, children, liberators, rescuers, and “others.” The class requirements include: in-depth critical analysis, challenging introspective responses, both verbal and written, group discussion and reflection, evaluation of primary documents, organizational skills, personal leadership, and three ongoing, culminating reflective projects “bearing witness” to one’s personal journey through the course.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Identities in Literature

    Literature Course

    Grade 11, 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    As Maya Angelou’s poem says, “We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.” This course will examine perspectives, themes, and voices from those often underrepresented to understand the commonalities and the differences that make up the human experience. Groups are marginalized, oppressed, and often silenced based on many factors. This course will explore some of those factors through short stories, novels, speeches, plays, and film. It is also important to understand multiple viewpoints and understandings, while aligning with common themes. The goal of this course will be to explore current and past injustices to understand how power can shape perceptions and see how people resist, fight, and change the way people are viewed. The goal is to celebrate diversity by embracing, studying, and experiencing it.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Irish Literature

    Literature Course

    Grade 11, 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    Students examine a variety of critically acclaimed works (prose, poetry, and drama) and the role storytelling played in the construction of a sense of Irishness and Irish Nationalism. Students will read literature that begins with Celtic Ireland’s myths and legends to Modern Ireland’s writers who helped create an Irish national pride. Important historical and cultural events will be identified and analyzed in order to offer increased understanding of Irish literature’s evolution. The goal of the course is for students to develop an appreciation of Ireland’s literature and the contribution of Irish writers to the corpus of world literature. Students will be evaluated through quizzes, tests, research, and a minimum of three essays.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Literature of Controversy

    Literature Course

    Grade 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    Writers and works that have been banned or censored or that deal with controversial issues are the focus of this course. Readings from modern and contemporary writers of national and international consequences deal with such subjects as the role of women, the repression of minorities, the struggle for political freedom, war, and the challenges of scientific progress. Students study a variety of genres: novel, short story, poetry, drama, essay, and film. The class responds to the issues through group discussion and in a variety of writing assignments.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Modern American Classics in Fiction

    Literature Course

    Grade 11, 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    This course answers the question “What makes a great American novel?” That is, one that will continue to receive critical acclaim and be considered a classic throughout the years as a part of America’s cultural heritage. This question will include studying the historical time period and its influence on the writer, stylistic moves, and themes, literary devices, and vocabulary employed throughout the writings. Students will read required works, participate in class discussions of those works, and complete written assignments including literary analysis papers. Works of such authors as Ernest Hemingway, Edith Wharton, Toni Morrison, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and others are a focus.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN College Prep Writing

    Writing Course

    Grade 11, 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    This is a course for students who want to gain confidence in their writing skills before going to college. It is designed as a “lab” course that combines reading and writing inquiry as necessary in becoming a writer. Utilizing the Six Traits of Writing (voice, organization, idea creation, conventions, word choice, and sentence fluency) students work through a writing process in class to revise and polish final drafts. Students will write different types of papers such as narrative, review, proposal, argument, and analysis. Several of these writing types will include research reading and inclusion along with reading mentor texts/writings of the types of papers being written at the time.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Creative Composition

    Writing Course

    Grade 11, 12
    Semester Course, .5 credit

    Students become authors in this class that concentrates on the development of creative writing skills. They will step outside of the box of academic writing and explore their creative sides. A special emphasis is placed on strategies for creating imagery and appealing to sensory details by showing-and-not-telling. Students will learn the importance of word choice, point of view, characterization, and creating effective dialogue. Techniques for brainstorming and editing their own, as well as their peers’ work, will be implemented. Since learning to give and receive constructive criticism is a key part of life, students will review one another’s work to give voice to their opinions and allow student authors to hear critical feedback about their creations. Students will compose many unique pieces including a reflective journal, a memoir as well as several short essays, stories, and poems.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Journalism

    Writing Course

    Grade 11, 12

    Semester Course, .5 credit

    Students discuss the role and influence of the press in modern society and the concept of responsible journalism, drawing from media of print, online, and broadcast. They learn the fundamentals of reporting, including interviewing and how to write in journalistic style through the writing of news, feature, sports, and editorial pieces. The class is hands-on and through a variety of activities, members of the class are both students of journalism and practicing journalists, with the potential to have their work appear in the school newspaper, The Voice.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Technical Writing

    Writing Course

    Grade 10, 11, 12
    Semester course, .5 credit

    May be taken for Computer Science & Engineering credit or English credit, but not both.

    Technical writing offers the skills and practices of writing in various workplace environments and professional communities. The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the “real-world” writing they will see in their future science, business, industry, or government fields. This course will address the importance of good writing and reaching an intended audience in professional disciplines where writing is not normally considered an important skill. Students will produce and analyze technical definitions, abstracts and summaries, mechanism descriptions, instructions, process analyses, technical reports, proposals, correspondence, and job procurement. Projects may include writing a step-by-step guide of a technical or science-based procedure, writing definitions for science jargon, writing letters, memos, or emails in regard to a technical problem, creating resumes and cover letters, and responding to a request for a business proposal.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN ACP Writing and Research

    Writing Course

    Grade 11, 12
    Semester Course, .5 credit

    This semester course integrates critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Sequenced reading and writing assignments build cumulatively to more complex assignments. Students write in multiple genres beginning with a personal narrative and moving through an argument that is supported by advanced research methodologies. Assignments focus on writing and composing for particular purposes, audiences, and contexts. Students utilize both formal and informal writing, drafting and revising, editing for correctness, synthesizing source material, and documenting sources accurately.

    Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, B+ average in current honors course or an A in current regular course, and departmental approval

    Registering for college credit is required for this course.

    Students have the opportunity to earn 3 college credits for this semester course through UMSL:
    ENGL 1100 First Year Writing
  • EN Honors Voices of Human Rights

    Literature or Writing Course

    Grade 12

    Year-long Course, 1 credit

    (.5 Credit English and .5 Credit Social Studies)

    This is a cross-curricular English and Social Studies course. The course will discuss major violations of human rights around the globe over the past 40 years - with an emphasis on genocides. It will also cover violations in North Korea, Rwanda, Cambodia, Bosnia, and current conflicts. The overwhelming theme/response to all aspects of this course is outrage at how these violations could occur in our modern world and disbelief that this is the first time many are hearing about them. For each conflict studied, students will read, discuss, debate, engage, and attempt to find solutions for these large scale problems. Additionally, a large part of this course will be the culminating project. This project will impact all aspects of academic growth, and it will be worth it.

    Prerequisite: instructor/departmental approval
  • EN AP/ACC Senior English

    Literature and Writing Course

    Grade 12

    Year-long Course, 1 credit

    The first semester of this AP/ACC course focuses on reading non-fiction and on writing and composing for specific purposes, audiences, and contexts. Class discussion and readings address the function of rhetoric and of composing in a variety of contexts and audiences. Students utilize current research methodologies on topics of interest, using academic research to move from a broad to more focused question, always considering audience and purpose. While engaged in composing, students will learn to respond constructively to their peers’ texts and to use peer responses, along with extensive instructor feedback, to improve the quality of their work. The second semester of this AP/ACC course provides the student with a serious study of imaginative literature and gives a comprehensive introduction to the principal forms of fiction, poetry, and drama. Writing assignments focus on the personal essay, the literary paper, and novel studies including research methods. While engaged in composing, students will learn to respond constructively to their peers’ texts and to use peer responses, along with extensive instructor feedback, to improve the quality of their own work.

    Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, B+ average in current honors course or an A in current regular course, and departmental approval

    Students are required to either take the AP exams and/or register for SLU credit.
    AP Exam: AP English Language and Composition
    AP Exam: AP English Literature and Composition

    Students have the opportunity to earn 6 college credits for this year-long course through SLU:
    ENGL 1900 Advanced Strategies Rhetoric and Research
    ENGL 2250 Conflict, Social Justice, and Literature
  • EN Film Appreciation

    Grade 12
    Semester Course, .5 credit

    This course does not count toward the four English credits needed for graduation.

    Students will leave this course with a comprehensive way to look at films that goes beyond saying, “I liked it.” Much like a literature class, Film Appreciation is designed to look at the many choices behind the creation of a piece of work. Students will look at the purpose behind aesthetic decisions of screen-writers, directors, and cinematographers. Additionally, students will study a basic history of film from the silent era, talkies, the Golden Age of Hollywood, to the present innovations of technology, and blockbuster movies. The course will discuss the collaborative process of film-making, important moments and movie-makers, and personal reactions to films.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Special Projects in Journalism

    Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
    Year-long Course, .25 credit (Pass/fail credit)

    Elective Course: This course does not count toward the four credits needed for graduation. This course may be repeated for credit.

    Students in Special Projects in Journalism will work on student media in either print or broadcast. This minicourse will meet once a week during unstructured time or before/after school. It is also expected that members will work outside of regular school hours, and is based on participation on and contribution to St. Joe media, The Voice or St. Joe TV. Students will work in groups and individually to create work for St. Joe media. Tasks will vary and skills learned can include researching stories, publishing original writing and photography, and creating print or digital layout through Adobe software InDesign, Photoshop, or Premiere Pro. In order to receive credit for this pass/fail course, students will be required to produce a certain number of pieces per school year, depending on editorship or staff position.

    Prerequisite: No prerequisites but incoming freshmen must discuss with the instructor before preregistering for the course.
  • EN Irish Literature (Summer Course)

    Summer Course - offered for June of 2023 (specific dates to be determined)

    Rising Grade 10, 11, 12

    Summer Course, .5 credit

    Elective Course: This course does not count toward the four English credits needed for graduation.

    *Students will register for this course in 2023.

    Students will read a variety of writers and learn important historical and cultural events in order to offer an increased understanding of the evolution of Irish literature. As part of this summer experience, students will be able to apply their understanding of the literature read in class by touring Ireland and experiencing firsthand the culture, geography, and history that has inspired its writers for centuries. The goal of the course is for the students to become more familiar with writers who have contributed a great deal to the corpus of world literature. Students will be evaluated through reading reflections, and creating their own research question to be answered through their exploration of Irish culture.

    Prerequisite: none
  • EN Shakespeare (Summer Course)

    Summer Course - offered for June of 2024 (specific dates to be determined)

    Rising Grade 10, 11, 12

    Summer course, .5 credit

    Elective Course: This course does not count toward the four English credits needed for graduation.

    *Students will register for this course in 2024.

    Students examine a variety of critically acclaimed works (prose, poetry, and drama) in English literature. As part of this summer experience, students will be able to apply their understanding of the literature read in class by touring England, and experiencing firsthand the culture, geography, and history that inspired William Shakespeare. Students will read plays and poetry as both a product of Shakespeare’s age and as classic literature that has relevance for modern audiences and readers.

    Prerequisite: none

    Mandatory for receiving credit: Students spend one week in class prior to touring England; students spend one week in class after returning from England.

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

The following co-curricular activities are available in this discipline. For more information, please click the link.

Departments

English Department

List of 7 members.

  • Photo of Elizabeth Kelley

    Ms. Elizabeth Kelley 

    English, Department Chair
    (314) 394-4127
  • Photo of Kelly Berry

    Mrs. Kelly Berry 

    English
    (314) 394-4099
  • Photo of Katie Kilcullen

    Mrs. Katie Kilcullen 

    English
    (314) 394-4138
  • Photo of Chelsea Layton

    Ms. Chelsea Layton 

    English
    (314) 394-4199
  • Photo of Daniella Moshi

    Ms. Daniella Moshi 

    English
    (314) 394-4128
  • Photo of Katie Richardson

    Mrs. Katie (Kieffer) Richardson 99

    English
    (314) 394-4089
  • Photo of Amy Hanson Summers

    Ms. Amy Hanson Summers 

    Computer Science & Engineering - Department Chair, English
    (314) 394-4079
St. Joseph’s Academy is a college preparatory high school sponsored by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Our mission at the Academy is to provide quality Catholic education for young women in an environment that challenges them to grow in faith, knowledge, and respect for self and others. Our community expects these young women to make a profound impact in the world.  

St. Joseph's Academy

2307 South Lindbergh Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63131
Phone: 314-394-4300
Fax: 314-965-9114
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